WILDLIFE CONFLICT SOLUTIONS

As natural habitat is gobbled up by human expansion, we give wild animals no choice but to adapt to living close to us. The least we can do is adapt to living with them as well. If you have the privilege of sharing your yard with some native wildlife consider yourself lucky to observe a piece of the disappearing wilderness.

If you are experiencing a wildlife conflict consider the causing factors. Critters may take up residence in your backyard because you have inadvertently done something to attract them, whether it be the garden you planted, the trash you so kindly left out, the warm structure you provided, or the predator free environment you have facilitated through landscaping.

If you are attempting to deter an animal during spring, summer, or early fall be aware that there may be young involved. Special measures must be taken to ensure that these helpless babies are not trapped or orphaned. Identify the species in question and call us for more detailed advice.

The following information offers some suggestions for dealing with conflicts through humane and non-invasive means. Feel free to call us at (636) 394-1880 with any questions.

WILDLIFE IN YOUR TRASH

Keep your trash cans in the garage or other enclosed area. Put trash out the morning of pick up instead of the night before. If raccoons are the culprits, secure lids closed with bolt clips (like those on the end of a dog leash), and keep trash cans upright by fastening them to a sturdy pole or stake.

WILDLIFE IN A DUMPSTER

Place a tree branch or a piece of lumber diagonally from the dumpster floor to the top. The animal will climb out when he deems it safe to do so. Often a raccoon or opossum will wait until dark to exit.

WILDLIFE IN YOUR GARDEN

Put up a barrier fence using 1/4-inch hardware cloth. It should extend at least one foot below the surface and three feet above. This should deter rabbits and some burrowers. Commercial rodent repellents may also be useful. They are available at most garden or hardware stores. Cayenne pepper may be sprinkled around plants to deter unwanted nibblers.

WILDLIFE GNAWING YOUR TREES

You can protect fruit or ornamental trees by wrapping the bottom three feet of the trunk in hardware cloth.

WILDLIFE DIGGING IN YOUR YARD

Put up a perimeter fence that is at least 4 feet tall and extends at least 18 inches into the ground. Use an environmentally safe insect control product to eliminate bugs as a food source. Place noise-making devices (pinwheels) around your yard.

WILDLIFE UNDER YOUR HOUSE, DECK OR PORCH

Block off all access holes except one. Place dryer sheets in the area. The odor will eventually drive the animal(s) away. Sprinkle baby powder or flour outside the remaining access hole. Check daily for activity. Once you are sure that the den is no longer being used, seal the access hole. To be certain, sprinkle baby powder or flour inside and outside the newly sealed hole. In the following 48 hours, check the access hole on both sides of the barrier several times to be sure that all of the former residents have truly vacated.

WILDLIFE IN YOUR CHIMNEY OR FIREPLACE

Hang a heavy rope from the top of the chimney in case the animal cannot get out the same way it got in. Place scented dryer sheets in the fireplace to deter the animal. Once the critter has vacated, properly cap the chimney.

WILDLIFE IN YOUR HOUSE

If a wayward animal should make its way into your home do not attempt to catch it yourself. This could be dangerous for you and your belongings that would surely be damaged in the pursuit. Close off access to the rest of your home and open as many doors and windows to the outside as possible. This will give the animal time to calm down and find its own way out.